Law and Society Association, San Francisco (2011)

Perspectives on Gender and Diversity in Law Firms – SESSION CODE 135085

There is a persistent underrepresentation of women lawyers among the higher ranks and leadership positions of law firms, particularly elite law firms, in the U.S. as well as in other countries in the world.  In this session we will examine how gender matters in the paths to power and in what way diversity concepts are used and work. We will examine how women’s experiences differ from those of men, looking for explanations embedded in the law firms´ culture. The session is part of the work of the Legal Profession Group, a working group in the RCSL (Research Committee for the Sociology of Law) and the newly set up IRC (International Research Collaborative) on “Women in Global Practices: Large Law Firms and Perspectives on Gender” for the Hawaii Meeting 2012.

 

Deborah Rhode: „Diversity and Gender Equity in Law Firms”,

Daniel Muzio, Jenny Tomlinson: “Individual and Organizational Responses to the diversity challenges in the legal profession in England and Wales”

Theresa Beiner: “Sleeping and Dreaming:  How Law Firms Undermine Gender Diversity and Increase Client Costs through High Billable Hour Requirements.”

Lisa Webley Equality and diversity in the legal profession in England and Wales: The importance of the ‘right’ academic background

Elizabeth Duff: Parenthood as a Barrier to Career Progression.

Chair: Carole Silver

Discussant: Cynthia Fuchs Epstein

Perspectives on Gender in Law Firms – SESSION CODE 135084

There is a persistent underrepresentation of women lawyers among the higher ranks and leadership positions of law firms, particularly elite law firms, in the U.S. as well as in other countries in the world.  In this session we will examine how gender matters in the paths to power. We will examine how women’s experiences differ from those of men, looking for explanations embedded in the law firms´ culture. The session is part of the work of the Legal Profession Group, a working group in the RCSL (Research Committee for the Sociology of Law) and the newly set up IRC (International Research Collaborative) on “Women in Global Practices: Large Law Firms and Perspectives on Gender” for the Hawaii Meeting 2012.

 

Gabriele Plickert: Paradoxical Choices? Gendered career trajectories of Law School Graduates in the U.S. and Germany

Sweethaa Ballakrishnen: Women in large law firms- an Indian perspective

Hillary Sommerlad: Misrecognising merit – the role of cultural practices in getting in and getting on: a study of the legal profession in England and Wales

Anna Zimdars: Social Structure, Equal Opportunities, and the Competition for Pupillages at the Bar of England and Wales.

Chair: Rob Rosen

Discussant: Joyce Sterling

 

 

Gender and Judging – Comparative Aspects, sponsored by CRN 32 Gender and Judging – SESSION CODE 135045

Session description:

This group started work as an IRC at the LSA meeting in 2006 and was granted the status of a CRN in 2008. It has arranged numerous sessions at various International Conferences. The outcomes so far are special issues of the “International Journal of the Legal Profession” and of “Feminist Legal Studies”. A collection of 30 papers resulting from a workshop at the International Institute for the Sociology of Law will be published by Hart publishers in 2011. The group uses a blog for the internal communication. It deals with any aspects of gender and judging in all countries around the world. In this session gender issues from South Africa, Israel, Syria, USA and Australia will be discussed.

 

Ruth Cowan: Do women on South Africa’s courts make a difference?

Guy Seidman: “Women as the Court” – assessing the impact of all-women-

panels of the Israeli Supreme Court.

Maria da Gloria Bonelli: Gender, Difference and Professionalism among Brazilian Judges

Elaine Martin: Women Lawyers: The Judicial Track

Kathy Mack, Sharyn Roach Anleu: Women in the judiciary and new approaches to judging

Discussant: Martha Good

Chair: Ulrike Schultz

Gender and Judicial Education, sponsored by CRN 32 Gender and Judging – SESSION CODE 135050

Session description:
Judicial education has greatly expanded in common law countries in the past 25 years. More recently it has become a core component in judicial reform programs in developing countries with gender attentiveness as an element required by donor agencies. In civil law jurisdictions, judicial schools have long played a role in the formation of the career judiciary with a focus on entry to the judicial profession and in-service education. Gender questions, however, tend to be neglected in the curricula.

These judicial education activities have generated a significant body of material and experience which is timely for scholarly review and dissemination:

What is the state of affairs? How is judicial education implemented in developed and developing countries all around the world? Who are the educators? Who is educated? What are the theories of gender and equality which are animating these programs? How is judicial education on gender regarded by judges? How effective are these programs?

In what way finally can the experiences be compared to those with gender education for lawyers and law firms?

This is the first session of the IRC on Gender and Judicial Education for the Hawaii Meeting 2012.

Trish Luker: Australian Feminist Judgments Project
Kathleen Mahoney: Gender and Judging in Vietnam

Ann Stewart: Assessing the long term impact of gender training on higher judicial officers (judges) in India

Monique Cardinal: Women Legal Professionals and Their Criticism of the 2009 Draft Family Law in Syria

Beatriz Kohen: Gender Education for the Judiciary in Argentina – An assessment of

its history, extent, impact and perspectives

Ulrike Schultz: Gender and Judging: Comparative Aspects.

Chair: Angela Melville

Discussant: Bryna Bogoch